Cica

Radnai Zsófia
Hungary

tenaflyviper:

18 Various Kinds of Opals  

When most people think of an opal, they might think of a milky-colored stone containing a rainbow of stripes or flecks inside it.  What many people don’t know is that they are incredibly diverse in appearance, and are not actually minerals.  Opals are a solid, amorphous form of silica, and are classified as “mineraloids”.  Like other mineraloids, such as amber, pearl, and obsidian, they lack structural order, or “crystallinity”. 

From the top:

  • Black Opals
  • Cat’s Eye Opals
  • Dendritic Opals
  • Flamingo Opals
  • Peruvian Pink Opals
  • Zebra Opals
  • Leopard Opals
  • Yowah Nut and Koroit Opals (both have the same characteristics - they merely come from two different areas).
  • Brown Opals
  • Ethiopian Honeycomb Opals
  • Green Opals (Serbian, Tanzanian, and Brazilian)
  • Peruvian Blue Opals
  • Matrix Opals
  • Landscape Opals (Andean and Australian)
  • Mexican Fire Opals
  • Crystal Opals
  • Australian Boulder Opals
  • Ethiopian Ribbon Opals

(Side note - the image backgrounds are transparent, except for the matrix/landscape picture, which seems hellbent on being an asshat, no matter how many times I try to fix it)

(via opal-porn)

nubbsgalore:

photos by jeff cremer of orange julia and sulfur yellow butterflies drinking the salty tears of a tracajá turtle in the peruvian amazon. sodium is a scarce resource in the western amazon, where there is little mineral content to rain water, so the butterflies have learned to get it where they can. luckily for the butterflies, the turtles don’t much mind, despite deriving no reciprocal benefit themselves. (see also: previous turtle posts)

(via earth-song)